Reading for the Head and Heart

This is a list from RZIM ministries. What a way to spend the Summer!

Recommended Reading

Introductory Recommended Reading

John Bunyan, Pilgrims Progress
Daily Light on the Daily Path (collection of Bible readings)
Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth
Os Guinness, The Call: Finding and Fulfilling the Central Purpose of Your Life
C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity
C.S. Lewis, Screwtape Letters
J.I. Packer, Knowing God
Roger Steer, George Muller: Delighted in God
John Stott, The Cross of Christ
John White, The Fight
Brother Yun, Heavenly Man
Ravi Zacharias, The Grand Weaver: How God Shapes Us through the Events of Our Lives

Further Reading in Apologetics

Norman Geisler, Christian Apologetics
Alister McGrath, The Twilight of Atheism: The Rise and Fall of Disbelief in the Modern World
Esther Lightcap Meek, Longing to Know: The Philosophy of Knowledge for Ordinary People
Amy Orr-Ewing, Is the Bible Intolerant?
Francis Schaeffer, A Francis Schaeffer Trilogy: The God Who Is There, Escape from Reason, He Is There and He Is Not Silent
James W. Sire, Naming the Elephant: Worldview As a Concept
N.T. Wright, Simply Christian: Why Christianity Makes Sense
Ravi Zacharias, Can Man Live Without God?
Ravi Zacharias, ed., Beyond Opinion: Living the Faith We Defend

20 Questions for Prospective Pastors

20 Questions for Prospective Pastors to Ask of their Prospective Churches

This is the first of an occasional series about the sometimes awkward interchange between churches seeking shepherds and shepherds seeking flocks.

To be certain, there are many other areas that should be addressed. These include the arenas of doctrine, staff relationships, and the leading of the Spirit of God to call a man to the work. Also, the present way many churches seek a pastor whether it is a “beauty contest” with multiple preachers presented before one is considered, or the “few services and vote” approach, I strongly suggest there is a much better alternative to either of these. Continue reading 20 Questions for Prospective Pastors

Walk the Aisle from christianitytoday.com

Walk the Aisle | Christian History

Story Behind
Walk the Aisle
Popularized by frontier camp meetings and Charles Finney’s “anxious bench,” the altar call became an evangelistic staple of American churches.
Douglas A. Sweeney and Mark C. Rogers

Walk the Aisle

The pastor closes his sermon: “The Holy Spirit bids you come. The congregation, praying, hoping, expectant, bids you come. On the first note of the first stanza, come down one of these stairways, down one of these aisles. May angels attend you. May the Holy Spirit of God encourage you. May the presence of Jesus walk by your side as you come, while we stand and while we sing.” And come they do. Week after week, in churches all across the America—and other parts of the world—scenes like this play out at the end of thousands of sermons. The congregation stands and sings “Just As I Am” or “Come Just as You Are.” Sinners walk the aisle and pray for salvation.

This common evangelistic method, known as the altar call or the public invitation, has not always been around. Successful evangelists such as George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, and John Wesley never gave an altar call. In fact, they did not even know what it was. They invited their hearers passionately to come to Christ by faith and regularly counseled anxious sinners after their services. But they did not call sinners to make a public, physical response after evangelistic appeals. So where did the altar call come from? When did it begin?